Top 10 Essential Irish Travellers Clothing

irish travellers clothing

Irish culture becomes more fun and interesting when you learn about the typical Irish travelers clothing. One way to appreciate a country’s culture is by learning about the way they dress and why they dress that way. And you get a comprehensive history lesson by learning about traditional Irish clothing. Below are 10 Irish traveling clothing essentials from the past and present:

Leine

Leine

The traditional shirt worn by both noblemen and peasants alike. The Leine extended to the knees and was narrow at the top while tapering down to the bottom. It was worn by both the men and the women (with women’s leines extending further below the knees). They were usually made from plain linen. Leines of noblemen had elaborate embroidery designs and patterns to connote their superior status.

Brat

Brat

A piece of material, either rectangular or oval in shape, folded several times, draped over the shoulders and pinned with a brooch. In more ancient times, the brat served only as a shawl or a hood. Later on, the brat became a sort of a cloak to protect Irishmen from the cold weather. The number of colors your brat has signified your status in life. Royalty had seven colors, the Druids six, noblemen four, while freemen could only have a single color scheme for their brats.

Ionar

Ionar

Was a coat that covered the leine. The ionar was usually made of a thick garment to provide insulation from the cold. Typical fabrics used were wool or leather. It was also adorned with decorations to make them stand out.

Trews

Trews

Were clothing for the lower extremity that spanned the abdomen all the way to the feet. These trousers were common in the old days and even had leather trims. The traditional trews were form-fitting. While there were variations that were cut at knee length.

Aran Sweater

Aran Sweater

These sweaters originated in the island of Aran in the 1900s. They’re usually associated with fishermen because these sweaters have water repellent properties. The rich and intricate cabling design is the trademark of the Aran sweater. Many Irishmen still wear these sweaters to this day.

Tara Brooch

Tara Brooch

Considered as the most impressive of all Irish brooches. These brooches usually adorned the brat.

Wool Tweed Driving Cap

Wool Tweed Driving Cap

The driving cap is a staple in every stylish Irishman’s closet. These caps are characterized by the full rear and flat brim. It’s made of wool and come in tweed and herringbone patterns. These caps provide warmth and sophistication at the same time. You can see these caps also being worn in neighboring countries such as England and Scotland.

Brogue Shoes

Brogue Shoes

These shoes have perforations to allow water to drain. The perforations became a necessity in the old days because the freemen from island had to walk through swamps and bogs. Today, the brogue has taken a more modern look. It has also become the footwear of choice for stylish men everywhere.

Linen Driving Cap

Linen Driving Cap

A variation of the wool kind, the linen driving cap is a more affordable option. These caps, mostly in neutral colors, have varied patchwork and patter designs.

Tweed Jackets

Tweed Jackets

This simple and elegant jacket takes a lot of effort to weave. Tweed looms are specially created to create these jackets and can even take months to weave. Tweed jackets are popular in Ireland because of the availability of tweed in the country.

Ready to learn more about Irish traveling clothing? Head on down to an Irish clothing store and see these clothes for yourself.

Comments

comments